US Inequality Rises: "The number of billionaires in the United States has more than doubled in the last decade, from 267 in 2008 to 607 last year, according to UBS." and meanwhile "Rents in New York have risen twice as fast as wages, according to StreetEasy data from 2010-2017, squeezing lower-income residents. And the number of homeless people sleeping in the city’s shelters is 70% higher than a decade ago".

New York’s new malls: Hudson Yards, Empire Outlets, and more: "Experts claim retail is dead, but the “vertical centers” and “food halls” in America’s densest city just keep coming." One big shopping mall. At odds with previous.

Neanderthals glued their tools together: “We continue to find evidence that the Neanderthals were not inferior primitives but were quite capable of doing things that have traditionally only been attributed to modern humans,” said co-author Paolo Villa, adjunct curator at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History.

Class and optimism: "What I’m describing here is a little different from the tendency for posh people to be more confident than the rest of us, but perhaps connected. My point is that posh folk are more optimistic than others not just about their personal prospects, but about prospects for the economy generally."

A Field Goes to War With Itself: "While medievalists battle, white nationalists try to co-opt the past." Has that tendency not always been there? After all, and at least in Europe, this is the period where territorial state formations start appearing. Fertile ground.

Inside Paraguay’s failed Aryan ‘utopia’: "Deep in the jungle of central Paraguay, a town announces itself with a wire sign suspended between two stone towers that look like freestanding Medieval turrets: “Bienvenidos a Nueva Germania,” it reads. A few thousand people live in “New Germany” today, but if the town’s founders had their way, it would have taken over the entire South American continent."

TITLE

Travel Back In Time To The High Line When It Was Beautifully Abandoned And Overgrown

TITLE

Nigeria's cattle-raising Fulani people – in pictures

TITLE

Lucinda Rogers - New York - Houston Street from Lafayette Street

Private Equity and "Institutional" Investor Owned U.K. Utility Engaged in Massive Fraud, Regulatory Evasions, Worker Coercion, Caused "Catastrophic" Environmental Damage: well, color me surprised. And not about this, either: 'We all suffer': why San Francisco techies hate the city they transformed. And then there is the gig economy, and the fact that Alabamians defend the arrest of woman whose fetus died in shooting. I should stop following the news.

TITLE

Street Photographer Jorge Garcia Finds Perfect, Spontaneous Moments on NYC's Sidewalks

TITLE

Photographs by Paul Johnson Document a Once-Thriving Farm Community Subsumed by Rising Waters

TITLE

Weird, Wonderful Photos From Another Era

In rich white Streeterville, Chicagoans can expect to live to 90. In poor black Englewood, it’s just 60 – the most divergent of any US city.

The new left economics: how a network of thinkers is transforming capitalism says The Guardian. Does not seem as if they transform anything. Yet? Britain ‘increasingly divided’ with most influential people five times more likely to have gone to private school - good place to start transforming. See also the sham of shareholder capitalism.

Furthermore, 9 people built an illegal $5M Airbnb empire in New York - and screwed the poor yet again. No wonder our neoliberal overlords love the gig and sharing economies, eh? But at least Microsoft employees want to starve its PAC, which keeps giving money to homophobic, racist, climate-denying Republicans.

TITLE

Shopkeepers Around the World, Photographed With Their Wares

TITLE

The leading African photographers across the continent

Walmart got a $2.2 billion tax cut and now it's laying off workers, while in Chicago, the rich live 30 years longer than the poor. No one should be a billionaire complements Germany’s business barons are finding it harder to keep a low profile. And at the same time the chance of a 15-year-old boy dying by the age of 50 is now higher in America than in Bangladesh, but the article also points out that there are some positive signs in worldwide demographics.

Will Hot-Desking Kill Your Company? "Hot-desking is a working arrangement where employees have no assigned desk. Each morning you get a workstation based on that old standby, first-come-first-served. If you show up at 5:30 a.m. then you'll likely have your pick. Later than 9 a.m., then probably you'll get what's left even if that means working apart from your colleagues. The theory behind this idea is that it provides companies with increased flexibility in managing office space." And I thought open space offices were bad enough.

I Made Meringues Out of My Own Blood and Ate Them: No. Just no.

TITLE

The Bohemian King of 1920s Paris You've Never Heard Of

TITLE

Lee Krasner Gets a Brilliant Barbican Retrospective

TITLE

Night Photography of Urban Japan

TITLE

Photographic Pioneers in Soviet-Era Latvia: the Story of Riga Photo Club

TITLE

TITLE

Tooting my own horn here: I took that photo. There are many more here.

TITLE

Porftolio|3d render architectural visualization projects|Quatrecaps|Spain

You could do worse than read some of this:

How computing's first 'killer app' changed everything : "According to the Planet Money podcast, in the US alone, there are 400,000 fewer accounting clerks today than in 1980, the first full year that VisiCalc went on sale. But Planet Money also found that there were 600,000 more jobs for regular accountants. After all, crunching numbers had become cheaper, more versatile, and more powerful, so demand went up."

Is the World Doomed to Far Rightwing Soft Dictatorship?: "Don’t bet on politics as usual to lower the temperature and put a stop to this moment’s tidal surge of ugly intolerance. Because the nature of the game has changed, those who oppose the global New Right must engage in a strategic rethink — or we’ll all drown in the rising waters."

Total Depravity: The Origins of the Drug Epidemic in Appalachia Laid Bare: "The influence of opioids on rural United States today eclipses these precedents. Perhaps only London in the throes of the Gin Craze, or Imperial China after the Opium Wars, could compare. This new phase, described as ‘the opioid epidemic’ (seldom capitalized), has different characteristics. It has been so frequently outlined by statistics that there is an accompanying complaint: that, like the old irony about deaths and statistics, these factoids muffle rather than amplify the tragedy. But the calamity is on a scale that cannot be quantified by other means."

Amazon, Walmart, and Other Stores Have Too Many Options: "The presence of so much stuff in America might be more valuable if it were more evenly distributed, but stuff’s creators tend to focus their energy on those who already have plenty. As options have expanded for people with disposable income, the opportunity to buy even basic things such as fresh food or quality diapers has contracted for much of America’s lower classes."

Europe's surging, far-right, "anti-establishment" parties: funded by billionaires, voting for billionaire-friendly policies, lining their own pockets : "Even as these parties are campaigning as insurgent anti-establishment forces, they have been largely funded by massive cash infusions, sometimes laundered through financial secrecy havens like Switzerland, sometimes openly attributed to the richest, most powerful people in Europe. What's more, the voting records of these parties reflect their debt to the super-rich, consistently opposing progressive taxation, anti-tax-evasion measures, strong labour laws, social benefits, and other measures that would benefit the voters who have backed these parties."

TITLE

The Voraciousness and Oddity of Dora Maar’s Pictures

TITLE

No place like home: eastern Europeans in the West Midlands

TITLE

Masha Ivashintsova (1942−2000)

TITLE

When Soviets met Stans: the tower blocks of central Asia