Posts tagged with “pretentious moi?”

Yes, that is indeed a blogroll. So quaint. I put it there yesterday.

You know: ever since I started blogging sometime in 2001, the demise of the independent, personal blog has been projected and the Golden Age of blogging deemed to be over already. I mean: in 2001, I should clearly have been around in 1995. Oh, man: that was blogging. The cool kids have moved on.

But judging from the length of that blogroll, they actually haven't. Not all of them. Other people notice, too, for example Kottke who has been at this longer than I and with much more consistency.

Only a short while ago, people left their blogs behind and claimed that their digital nourishment would henceforth be partaken of in places such as Facebook and Twitter. I, personally, have never really gotten into Twitter, and Facebook? Well: Facebook ...

So how do I actually find stuff? A bunch of RSS feeds through Feedly. Hacker News. MetaFilter. I have chosen these myself: they were not foisted upon me by one of Mr. Zuckerberg's algorithms.

Is this the return of the independent, personal blog? Perhaps not at the (relative) scale it once had, also because the 'net itself is so much larger today. And not all blogs are that independent and personal. We are swamped by all the celebs and semi-celebs that have blogs on various blogging platforms that are -- in reality -- all about non-disclosed affiliate deals and straight-up false advertising. And probably ghostwritten, too.

Medium? I dunno. The layout is bothersome. And it is not exactly focused and curated so you find a little bit of everything. The good. And the really bad.

So, onwards we go. Keeping up with good, independent content is more importand now than it ever was.

Post-modernists may be said to have developed a paradigm that clashes sharply with the one in this book. I have argued that modern life and art and thought have the capacity for perpetual self-critique and self-renewal. Post-modernists maintain that the horizon of modernity is closed, its energies exhausted—in effect, that modernity is passé. Post-modernist social thought pours scorn on all the collective hopes for moral and social progress, for personal freedom and public happiness, that were bequeathed to us by the modernists of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment. These hopes, post moderns say, have been shown to be bankrupt, at best vain and futile fantasies

Marshall Berman, All That Is Solid Melts Into Air:The Experience Of Modernity

The Philosophy of The Matrix: From Plato and Descartes, to Eastern Philosophy

The first and by far the most respected of the trilogy, The Matrix “largely interprets Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. Imagine a cave. Inside are people who were born and have spent their entire lives there, chained into a fixed position, only able to see the wall in front of them. As far as they know, this is the entire world.” The Wachowskis ask the same question Plato does: “How do we know what our reality really is?”

I always thought myself that the endless pretentious discussions about the "philosophy" of The Matrix are largely conducted by college-age single men who - in slightly different circumstances - would have been obsessing over Madame Rand. I still think the Wachowskis idly paged through some Philo 101 compendium and picked out whatever sounded cool or whatever. Or perhaps just randomly clicked through Wikipedia pages.

April is the cruellest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain.

T. S. Eliot